Getting your 13A – Permanent Resident Visa

Getting your Permanent Resident Visa

Link to: “The Bureal of Immigrations” Official Website for the latest updated information.
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Bureau of Immigration's Mandaue City, Cebu Philippines

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Note: This from Matt Wilkie:  Mandaue immigration in Cebu are enforcing the dress code. I know at different times of the year they don’t seem bothered but currently they have a guy outside renting out trousers for those wearing shorts (Tropical heat what do they expect people to be wearing?). Anyway one of my tenants came back this morning after parting with P50 to hire a pair of oversized tracksuit bottoms with “Philippines” written on the side of them just to enter immigration for renewal. Obviously those smart looking tracksuit bottoms are a better match to a shirt than the tan military type shorts he was wearing (Smart enough for military uniform but not immigration). Matt wondered how may sweaty people had worn the same trousers before. Source: Cebu Expat – Cebu Blog

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Question: Why become a Permanent Resident of the Philippines?

Answer: The biggest reason for becoming permanent resident is not having to extend the 2 month visa every 2 months at a cost of nearly P6,000 and having to report to the Bureau of Immigrations office near you every 2 months. You are also fined for being late for the extensions. Then after one year of extensions you are required to leave the country for up to a week. Then you can return to the Philippines and start the process all over again. The 13A Permanent Resident Visa only costs around P12,000 and is permanent, however you must report every 5 years to the Bureau of Immigrations for a review a far less hassle than every 2 months.

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http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php

Philippine Immigration Act of 1940, Section 13 (a) permanent residency in the Philippines.  This visa is issued to an alien on the basis of his valid marriage to a Philippine citizen.

To qualify for this visa, the applicant must prove that:

  • He contracted a valid marriage with a Philippine citizen.
  • The marriage is recognized as valid under existing Philippine laws.
  • There is no record of any derogatory information against him in any local or foreign law enforcement agency.
  • He is not afflicted with any dangerous, contagious or loathsome disease.
  • He has sufficient financial capacity to support a family and will not become a public burden.
  • He was allowed entry into the Philippines and was authorized by Immigration authorities to stay.
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Since I Charles Harman, arrived here in 2004 I have been living with Balikbayan (one year) and 59 day visas, it is now time to jump off the visa bandwagon sort of, and take the next step towards remaining here in the Philippines and that is to get my 13A. I mention visas in in my FAQ but I will explain a little more here. When you arrive here in the Philippines all you need to travel is your up-to-date passport. Then when when you deplane at the airport you go through customs and are issued the 21 day visa. After the 21 days are up you go to Immigrations in Manila or Cebu City or which ever city you are living close to and get your 59 day visa. This is just about a 2 month visa and runs around P 6,000 now. You can continue updating this visa up to a full year.  But at that time you must leave the country for a week then return to start the process all over again. There is also a visa called the Balikbayan Visa good for one year. To qualify for this visa your wife must be Filipino and arrive with you on your flight, she cannot meet you at the airport as there is no way for her to meet you as customs is a highly secured area. At Customs and Immigrations you can receive the Balikbayan stamp good for one year.

Now we come to the 13A Permanent Resident Visa. My one year runs out in February 10th 2011, so I either need to leave the country for a week (5 days) or look into getting the 13A. I will update this almost daily as I begin my processing for the 13A in Cebu City along with some photos.

Here’s some info about the 13A Permanent Resident Visa.

The 13A Resident visa is issued to non-restricted nationals who are legally married to Filipino citizens, to permanently reside in the Philippines as stated in the Philippine Immigration Act of 1940, Section 13 (a).

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View of the interiour of Bureau of Immingrations in Mandaue City Philippines

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Requirements

  1. Notarized letter of application by the Filipino spouse
  2. Accomplished and Notarized General Application Form (BI Form No. MCL-07-01)
  3. NSO authenticated copy of the Filipino spouse’s birth certificate
  4. NSO authenticated copy of the Marriage Contract (if married in the Philippines); or Philippine Embassy or Consulate authenticated copy of the Marriage Contract (if married abroad)
  5. Bureau of Immigration (BI) Clearance Certificate
  6. Photocopy of the foreign spouse’s passport showing the date of arrival and authorized period to stay

Proof of financial capacity
Marriage certificate
Proof of dissolution of previous marriage (if applicable)
Filipino spouse’s passport (or birth certificate)
Copy of Filipino spouse’s passport
Original of my own passport
Original and photocopies of children’s birth certificates
Several passport photos
Chest x-ray
Certificate of good moral character

Checklist of Documentary Requirements:

[ ] Notarized letter of application by the Filipino spouse

[ ] General Application Form accomplished and notarized (B1 Form No MCL-07-01)

[ ] NSO Authenticated copy of Birth Certificate of Filipino Spouse (or Passport)

[ ] Certified copy of the ID as Filipino citizen issued by BID

[ ] NSO authenticated copy of the Marriang Contract of alien and Filipoino spouse or authenticated by the Philippine embassy/consulate nearest to or in the place where the marriage was solemnized.

[ ] Bureau of Immigration (BI) clearance certificate

[ ] Plain photocopy of the passport of foreign national’s spouse showing applicant’s Bio-page, admission stamp and authorized stay of at least (20) calendar days from date of filing.

You can pick up the checklist and forms at Immigrations in Cebu City or your city and at the Embassy.

Also you need:

Proof of financial capacity
Marriage certificate
Proof of dissolution of previous marriage (if applicable)Original of your passport
Original and photocopies of children’s birth certificates if any
Several passport photos
Chest x-ray of you
Certificate of good moral character from a pastor of your church

February 12, 2011

Before I begin the 13A stuff I wanted to tell you about my trip down to Cebu City Yesterday and today going home.

We left the house around 10:00 AM and walked down to the main highway and waited for our bus. We saw two busses coming the first one’s driver pointed us to get the second bus behind him. This bus turned out to be one of the new air conditioned Ceres buses. These buses are very nice comfortable and cool. On our trip back home we ended up getting on the exact same bus we had been on the day before for our return trip, how often would you expect that to occur?  See Photos at the bottom of this page.

Beginning the Permanent Residence 13A process – Marianne and I have arrived in Cebu City on the 11th secured a hotel, Hotel Cesario beside the Bella Vista hotel on Quezon Highway, Lapu-lapu City directly after arriving on Mactan via the new bridge. The Bella Vista Hotel can be seen as you cross the bridge and arrive on Mactan Island. Make a right turn onto  Quezon Highway  and when you arrive at the Bella Vista there is a driveway to the right that goes down to the cheaper Hotel Cesario which shares the building with the Bella Vista Hotel. It also shares the lobby wireless internet access and restaurant. you get a free breakfast pass once your room is rented. After spending one night at the Hotel and working on my US clients in the Lobby via wireless internet supplied by the hotel (fast internet).  The next morning we got up around 9:00 AM went to eat breakfast and on to Immigrations.

I have been here since February 10th 2010 and my one year has run out as of the 11th and it is now the 12th. I was able to secure a 59 day (2 month) extension to my visa, which gives me 59 days to get my 13A permanent resident paperwork together and processed.  To extend you visa you first stop at a desk inside the lobby of immigrations someone will look over your passport and ask you if you would like a one or two month extension. I chose 2, then she gave ms some forms to fill out for the extension. I had my wife fill it out as here handwriting is much better than mine. Then the papers are given back to the attendant at the desk. She goes over it and gives it back to you and tells you to take it to Window 1. Then you wait for your name to be called out, for me this was only about 15 minutes. then you pick up the forms and passport from window 1 and take them over to the cashier. Then you sit and wait in the waiting area, until your name is called out again. This process took about 30 to 45 minutes. Then your name is called out the last time you go to the Cashier’s window and pay for your visa. The 2 month visa is now P5,553.50.Once you receive your passport and receipt you are free to go.

While at immigrations in Cebu City I always meet someone new this time I met a Lewis Sellers and his wife. He is a very nice talkative fellow and I enjoyed talking with him., but time went by fast as Lewis and I, his wife  and mine were busy talking about our experiences here in the Philippines.  We got along so well that we left Immigrations in the same taxi and headed over to the SM in Cebu City for lunch.  We ate lunch at The French Bakery in he SM Cebu City they have great pastries and as I found out, great lasagna, large 1/2 pound black Angus burgers for only P250 and great iced mocha coffee for P55.  Lewis is building a nippa exterior with a nippa palm covered roof very traditional Filipino styled home. His home will not be too far from where we are now in Bogo.  I believe this to be the beginning of a lasting friendship at least I hope it is.

DOWNLOADS FROM BUREAU OF IMMIGRATIONS

Source: http://www.dutchpickle.com/philippines/cebu/visa-extension-in-cebu.html

http://immigration.gov.ph/index.php

Some important info at the Bureau of Immigrations

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The following article was taken from Expat Blog.

Obtaining a 13A visa

By a British Expat

As my wife is Filipino I applied for a 13A non-quota immigration visa while we were living in the UK. I submitted my application form together with all the supporting documents to the Philippines Consulate in London. It was quite a fat file of papers as in addition to the application form itself you are required to provide in triplicate a report of the results of a list of medical tests including chest x-ray together with a certificate of good moral character, proof of financial capacity, marriage certificate, proof of dissolution of previous marriage (if applicable), a copy of my Filipino spouse’s passport (or birth certificate), original of my own passport and original and photocopies of my son’s birth certificate. I would strongly advise checking the latest requirements via the Philippine Consulate’s website in case they have altered. The checklist of requirements is on most consulate websites. Several passport photos are also required for the main application form and separately for the medical form. Finally there is the fee which at the time I applied was £108 in cash.

Most of that list is straightforward, it just takes time to pull it all together. My GP advised me to get a number of the tests done privately including the chest x-ray so I arranged these through a local private hospital. My GP then reviewed all the test results, carried out a physical examination and completed and signed the front sheet of the medical report. I almost forgot that the other piece of information I had to provide was proof that my GP was duly registered to practice medicine in the UK. The General Medical Council now have a website with a complete register of all doctors so I simply located and printed off the details relating to my own GP together with other details I found on the Internet to prove that he worked in that particular practice. Continue.

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Hotel Cesario Lapu-Lapu City Standard Room P1,460

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At the French Bakery for lunch, Mariaine Lewis and his wife

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At the French Bakery, Charles Marianne and Lewis's wife

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The Interior of a new Air Conditioned Ceres Bus. We took the exact same bus down and back again on the Return trip, same bus number.

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Marianne in one of the New Ceres Air Conditioned Bus 2

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Marianne in one of the New Ceres Air Conditioned Bus 3

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New Ceres Air Conditioned Bus 4, Notice the air and lights over each seat is similar to airliner cabins.

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One comment

  1. Hi there Charles, I just found your blog today -very nice. I’ve been in Cebu for a year and experienced the exact same things you’ve written about, so kudos to you for spreading the ‘experience’.

    Anyways, I just got married in December and would love to hear about your experience getting a 13A, as info on the web is sparse, especially from a reliable source. If your blog on this is as detailed as your others, I’m sure it’ll be very helpful. Thanks for all your effort.

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